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Bycatch is destroying seabird populations — and that includes penguins

A recent study reported on in the New York Times found that 400,000 seabirds are getting killed each year by gillnets — those long nets used by fishing vessels. And you can add roughly 160,000 additional seabirds that are hooked by longlines. In short, modern fishing practices are destroying the oceans and its creatures. From…

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Introducing EcoLit Books

I wrote awhile back about the emergence of eco-literature. Since then, I’ve seen more publishers awakening to eco-literature, but I’ve long wanted there to be a website that highlighted and reviewed these new titles. So now we have EcoLit Books. EcoLit Books is dedicated to books with environmental and animal rights themes. And it’s devoted to gathering both…

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The Whaling Industry Propped up by Japan (The US isn’t exactly innocent either)

From The New York Times: Most Japanese consumers have turned away from whale meat. The industry shipped just 5,000 tons in 2011, compared with 233,000 tons at the peak in 1962, according to data from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Demand this year is so low that the industry has cut its planned…

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The United States vs. The Sea Shepherd Society

I can’t say I’m surprised this day would come. When I began writing The Tourist Trail in 2008 I envisioned the FBI going after the leader of a fictional anti-whaling group. At the time, the US was largely neutral about the goings-on in the Southern Ocean. This was a matter between the Sea Shepherd and…

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I propose a new book category: Eco-fiction

As I’ve written about previously, categorizing The Tourist Trail has been no simple task. Although there are surprises, suspense, and plenty of action, I would not categorize the book as a “thriller” or “action & adventure” novel. But I also don’t feel that the book fits comfortably in the “literary fiction” category. After all, literary…